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IST 140 - Introduction to Computing

This guide contains resources to help with the research assignment in Dr. Engebretson's IST 140 course.

Databases

Selected Journals

How to Search in Databases

You need to use keywords when searching for materials in library databases. Typing a whole question into a database search box will not yield as many useful results. As you search, keep track of different terms authors use when talking about your topic. Adding these to your search strategy will likely help you find more useful sources.

Most databases use what is called Boolean logic. This is a way to combine your keywords to make your searches more efficient. Boolean operators include AND (narrows your search), OR (broadens your search), and NOT (excludes terms to narrow further).

This short video gives an overview of the best way to search in a database:

Video Length: 1:28

Used with permission from the Ronald Williams Library at Northeastern Illinois University.

The Search Strategy Builder is a tool designed to teach you how to create a search string using Boolean logic. While it is not a database and is not designed to input a search, you should be able to cut and paste the results into most databases' search boxes.

Concept 1 and Concept 2 and Concept 3
Name your concepts here    
Search terms Search terms Search terms
List alternate terms for each concept.

These can be synonyms, or they can be specific examples of the concept.

Use single words, or "short phrases" in quotes

or

or

or

or

or

or

or

or

or

or

or

or

The Search Strategy Builder was developed by the University of Arizona Libraries and is used under a Creative Commons License.

Can't Find an Article?

If you find an article citation without access to the full text, try one of these tips:

  1. Go to the Journals A-Z page and use the article search tab. Fill in all the information from the article citation. If the Library has access to the article in full text, the link(s) will be listed. You may also search just for the journal title. If you search this way you will have to navigate to the correct issue as listed in the citation for the article you are looking for. 
  2. Check Google Scholar for a PDF copy of the article. Paste the full title of the article into the search box for the best results. You may find a pdf from a trusted source. You can connect your Google Scholar account to the Doane Library for links back to our collection.
  3. First two options didn't work? Request the article through interlibrary loan! Most journal articles will be delivered via email within 1-2 business days. (Books or anything that needs to be mailed will take longer, so plan accordingly.)