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LAR101: Greenwich Village, 1913 (Reacting to the Past)

Evaluating Information

Critical Evaluation of Resources (Univ. of California Berkeley) - Covers scholarly vs. popular publications, primary vs secondary resources, authority, documentation.

Evaluating Web Pages: Techniques to Apply and Questions to Ask (Univ. of California Berkeley).

Using Primary Sources on the Web: Evaluating Primary Source Websites (American Library Association)

Document Analysis Worksheets  (National Archives)
Guide to analyzing various kinds of primary sources - written documents, photographs, cartoons, posters, maps, artifacts, motion pictures, and sound recordings.

Citing Sources

  • For MLA style citations, refer to the Purdue OWL's MLA Formatting and Style Guide or your course writing guide.
  • Remember to cite your source, when either quoting directly or paraphrasing. In other words, cite your source whenever you present an idea that isn't your own.
  • Websites must be cited in your notes/bibliography, too; if you cut and paste - or paraphrase - from a website, cite the webpage.
  • When in doubt, cite your source.
  • Remember to include a context for each quotation/paraphrase. Who said it? Why does it matter? How does this support or contradict the argument you're making?